Monday, July 19, 2010

Hip-Hop LIVES: "What if the Tea Party Was Black?"

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

i get the counterfactual approach kid..

it brings up an interesting game of rhetoric in which one juxtaposes the 'irony' of rhetoric such that it turns in on itslef.

but what exactly are you really gettin at as a modern day black intellectual?

race in america given it's racist past fosters a variety of forms of cascading and splintering subsets of racism (be they institutional or otherwise illogical.. just like the tea party). i don't think anyone would dare argue that that's new. which needless to say in and of itself remains fascinating and a sad shame, being that the same bullshit is allowed to be perpetuated and somehow persists...

i digress.

my concern with your approach is that it remains unclear as to what exactly are you getting at???

how are you proposing to enter into a truly intellectual or philosphical discussion regarding the issue of race such that your doesn't remain simply polemical or tautological (as it seems to be as of now)?

the inherent genius of the false concept of race is that that race begets race no matter what lens you focus through.
please see the controversy surrounding ieshuh griffin's slogan debate (http://www.jsonline.com/news/statepolitics/98941309.html) for further such topics of discussion.

when one chooses to focus on the issue of race-ism, how does one evolve past the trap of arguing pro-division and selectiv-ism and ultimately againt human-ism.

no doubt... america is on some bullshit with respect to its hipocrisy. again.. that aint new.

it's a tuff one kid..
i'm right there wit u on the foundation of your argument that 40years ago the government sought out and destroyed the black panther movement for the less than what the tea party has done.
again.. widely understood and little disputed.

be careful of where u take this if you want it to be pro-active..

in other words, i challenege you to attempt to answer your own question...

in their book revolution and evolution in the 20th century, grace lee boggs and jimmy boggs tackle some of what you are discussing.

i suggest you check it out and even take a trip to visit grace lee in detroit. ask her about where she stands on the aspect of the radical revolution of now.

Creative Commons License
Negrointellectual by Vernon C. Mitchell, Jr. is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at www.negrointellectual.blogspot.com.